America’s horse racing industry faces a big challenge

When the North American Triple Crown season (including three Kentucky Derby, Preakness, and Belmont – ND) approaches, the focus of attention should be on the winning candidates of the Kentucky Derby. Instead, Santa Anita racetrack must suspend activities due to the mass death of horses, causing people to ask questions about the safety of the race.

A young horse named Lets Light the Way has recently been killed after breaking a sesame bone in the ankle joint. Since December 26 last year, there have been a total of 21 racecourse deaths when competing or practicing at Santa. Earlier in 2017, 20 deaths occurred within 122 days of racing, according to data from the Jockey Club racehorse company.

“The safety, health and welfare conditions of horses and jockey are our top priorities,” said Tim Ritvo, executive director of Stronach Group, which owns the track, said in An announcement. “While we continue to conduct tests to ensure the safety of the track, the closure decision is a must at this time.”

This is the second time in eight days that the famous racetrack under the San Gabriel Mountains is closed.

Since the 2008 Kentucky Derby race, when the young Eight Belles was killed after finishing second, officials of the entertainment industry were concerned that a similar incident might make the sport become lost.

In a series of incidents in 2012, 24 racing horses died each week at tracks across the United States, many of them in shock or lack of regulatory protection. This prompted regulations to help protect racing horses across the country and reduce the number of deaths.

For example, in 2017, the ratio of horse racing to death is only about 1.61 / 1,000, compared to 2/1000 in 2009. In California, the number of dead horses has decreased by 60% in the last 13 years, with most of the decline occurring over the past few years, according to the California Horse Racing Council.