Horse riding in China: The process of introduction and development (part 2)

Horsemanship magazine also emphasized that China lacks the team of experts, trainers and veterinarians serving this sport. China has seen a huge increase in the world in equestrianism and its market in general. Interest in horses and related sports over the past 10 or 5 years has also increased dramatically. The competitions open up so much, people can participate and prove their skill.

Horse sales have increased, especially horses imported from abroad. Despite the real fascination of horse racing in China, business deals between European sellers and Chinese buyers have dented confidence in the international market. Typically buyers in China try to bargain to buy, at the last minute cancel the deal and the contract even lost interest after the horse was on its way to China. The seller paid thousands of dollars for shipping.

In favor of the American Quarter, a horse that specializes in a quarter mile race to China, the market for these horses has grown over the years, particularly Saddlebred and Standardbred. Those varieties have had a steady increase over the past 3 or 4 years. But the general direction is that the market will not expand unless there is more training and help for the clubs and more races from which there will be more horse shows, making it easier for everyone to participate. And this is fun, not just money. Horse dealers say the market will only expand as tastes on the sport increase.

The County Down Club in the suburbs of Shanghai was the first exclusive member club in China devoted to horse riding and fox hunting. The club takes its name from a county in Northern Ireland. Here, horsehoes were lined up neatly on the carpet, pictures of the hungry hounds on the fox hunt hung on the walls, fountains radiating from the mouths of the stone horses. County Down has dozens of horses and is at the forefront of promoting equestrian sports in China. Clubs are not only a place for entertainment but also for socializing. County Down has around 80 members with an annual membership fee of 58,000 yuan ($ 8,400). One of the benefits of the club is that its members can leverage each other. This allowed the members to interact outside of China, such as sending the members hunting foxes with European nobility.

Another event is the establishment of Wonder Horse, which provides horse-related products and services in Shanghai. This industry is growing for two main reasons. Chinese parents consider horse-riding a subject for the elite. It will help their children stand out more in highly competitive Chinese society. For adults, participation in equestrian sport can help them expand into broader aspects such as ownership, investment, travel, leisure, and social activities. More than just a sport, it’s been a new experience for the Chinese in recent times.

The water town of Pegasus with hotels, art galleries and shopping centers with Venetian-style gondolas all features a horse theme. There is also a horse riding club and the Horse Culture Museum. The town has more than 400 horses of dozens of breeds imported from around the world. Tourists line up long for horse-cart trips at a resort in Jiangsu, west of Shanghai. Once a week, purebred horses will parade and perform in front of a crowd in a luxurious arena designed in the Austro-Hungarian style. Including the repertoire, the girls sat in a white carriage, dressed in white robes and in a sparkling tiara that looked like the scene at an English royal wedding.